The Connecticut Department of Transportation (DOT) announced Friday, July 22, a proposed 5-percent fare increase on the main New Haven line and its branches, as well as on Shore Line East, that would take effect on Dec. 1. It would be in addition to a 1-percent increase previously scheduled to take effect around the same time. The proposal also includes increases in CTtransit bus fares statewide.

State Representative Gail Lavielle (R-143) issued a statement on Friday opposing the fare increases.

“I will oppose these fare increases and work with my colleagues on both sides of the political aisle to try to find a way to stop them from being implemented.”

In the coming months, the DOT will hold public hearings on the increases in communities along the Metro-North lines that are impacted by the fare hikes. But Lavielle told GOOD Morning Wilton that those hearings are being scheduled to begin at 4 p.m. and end at 7 p.m., times that will likely be very inconvenient to those impacted most by such hikes—commuters. She said she’ll be reaching out to DOT to push for better times.

Lavielle is a ranking member of the General Assembly’s Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation and a member of the Transportation Committee.

Lavielle’s full statement in response to the announcement is what follows:

“The total 6-percent increase is substantial and will hit Metro-North rail commuters particularly hard. They already had to swallow 5-percent increases in 2012, 2013, and 2014, and 1-percent increases in 2015 and 2016, and when you add it all up, their daily rail fares have become a significant drag on their household budgets. Because many commuters have no alternative to taking the train, they are essentially hostages to these increases, and they and their families are definitely feeling the impact.

“The fare increase proposal is a direct result of the $37 million in cuts imposed on the DOT in the 2017 budget passed by the majority last May. It’s just one example of the consequences of budgetary policies that are not serving the state or its residents well. Policy changes that include realistic revenue assumptions, state labor cost reforms, spending rigorously focused on essential services, limited borrowing, and business-friendly tax structures can change the direction of the state’s finances and reduce the heavy burdens falling on hard working commuters and taxpayers across the state.

“I will oppose these fare increases and work with my colleagues on both sides of the political aisle to try to find a way to stop them from being implemented.”

One reply on “Lavielle: “I Will Work to Stop Proposed Metro-North Fare Increases””

  1. Lavielle: I think the efforts should be directed at improving service to the Wilton branch instead of worrying about a 5% increase in fares. I’ll gladly pay a 10% increase for faster, more frequent trains.

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